The National Museum of Ethnology (Minpaku) is a research center for ethnology and cultural anthropology.
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Seminars, Symposia, and Academic Conferences

Saturday, February 25, 2017
《International Symposium》 Exploring Age-friendly Communities: Diverse People Aging in Place

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  • Date: Saturday, February 25, 2017
  • Venue: Conference Room 4, National Museum of Ethnology (Capacity: 80 people (entrance free))
  • Languages: Japanese & English (Simultaneous interpreters provided)
  • Where to call: aging [at] idc.minpaku.ac.jp
    *Please replace 'at' with @ and send.
 

Introductory Remarks to the Symposium

Since the beginning of the 21st century, various ideas have been put into practice all over the world toward creating age-friendly environments for all generations of people from diverse cultural backgrounds, and particularly for older adults. In the world’s major cities, accessibility and normalization has been promoted to enable people from diverse backgrounds to equally enjoy an inclusive environment. Interdisciplinary researches on gerontology, sociology, anthropology and architecture, and collaborative practices regarding politics and economic development such as community design and welfare policy have conducted, promoted by organizations such as the World Health Organization (WHO).
However, it is not only necessary to design social welfare regarding public care and care by insurance systems, but also to deepen our understanding of ways to support grass-root activities that support self-help and mutual aid. Research is needed on the local conditions and possibilities for change and on meaning-elements that guide human interaction across diverse boundaries, ages and abilities.
To meet this challenge, this international symposium will explore various approaches to the development of age-friendly communities from a variety of perspectives – sociological, cultural, gerontological and anthropological. Findings from research drawn from U.S. Midwestern communities will be compared with practices in Japan, Switzerland, Korea and elsewhere in order to reflect the diversity of solutions to aging in place.

 

Program

13:00 - 13:10 Welcome Remarks
SUDO Ken'ichi (Director-General, National Museum of Ethnology)
13:10 - 13:25 Introductory Remarks to the Symposium
SUZUKI Nanami (Professor, National Museum of Ethnology)
13:25 - 14:15 The Missing Ingredient in the Aging-friendly Community Movement
STAFFORD, Philip B. (Director of the Center on Aging and Community at the Indiana Institute on Disability and Community / Adjunct Professor, Department of Anthropology, Indiana University)
14:15 - 14:40 Toward Creating a Home in which People Continue to Live: Focusing on People's Practice in a Small Island in Nagasaki, Japan
YAMADA Chikako (Professor, Seitoku University)
14:40 - 15:00 Break
15:00 - 15:25 Activity and Reassurance in Old Age: An Examination of Japanese-style Continuing Care Retirement Communities
SANO-Fujita Mariko (Professor, Hiroshima University)
15:25 - 15:50 Age-friendly Communities in Korea: Focusing on the Cases of Communal Dining at “Gyeong-ro-dang”
SAWANO Michiko (Senior Researcher Ritsumeikan University)
15:50 - 16:15 Age Friendly Communities in Switzerland: Focusing on the Narrative on the Rhythm of Life and Aging-in-place
SUZUKI Nanami (Professor, National Museum of Ethnology)
16:15 - 16:40 Participatory Community Planning Using the Arts and Humanities
STAFFORD, Philip B. (Director of the Center on Aging and Community at the Indiana Institute on Disability and Community / Adjunct Professor, Department of Anthropology, Indiana University)
16:40 - 17:30 Discussion
 

Profile

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STAFFORD, Philip B. (Professor, Indiana University)
Director of the Center on Aging and Community at the Indiana Institute on Disability and Community, Adjunct Professor, Department of Anthropology, Indiana University; Faculty Affiliate at the Ostrom Workshop in Political Theory and Policy Analysis.
A cultural anthropologist, Phil received his BA from the University of Chicago and his Ph.D. from Indiana University. Phil has been instrumental in developing a wide range of programs for older persons: Alzheimer's Supports, Adult Day Care, Health Education, Respite Care, Housing Choice, and others. He is active in research and publishing around issues of community development for age-friendly communities. He has employed the humanities as a tool for community development in projects funded by the Retirement Research Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, and Indiana Humanities, including participatory arts projects in public housing neighborhoods. With support from Grantmakers in Aging, Phil provided leadership for the new Lifelong Indiana Coalition and is spearheading an innovative public policy/land use innovation called a Lifetime Community District along a multi-use trail in downtown Bloomington.
He also serves as a consultant to The AdvantAge Initiative, an age-friendly community project conducted in nearly 40 U.S. cities. He is a past president of the Association for Anthropology and Gerontology. He has published numerous articles on cultural aspects of dementia and the relationship between aging and place. His major publications include Gray Areas: Ethnographic Encounters with Nursing Home Culture (2003, Santa Fe: SAR Press) and Elderburbia: Aging with a Sense of Place in America (2009: Praeger). He is currently editing a new volume entitled The Global Age-Friendly Community Movement: A Critical Perspective (ND, Berghahn Press). In 2014, Phil was the recipient of the Walter S. Blackburn Award by the Indiana Chapter of the American Institute of Architects, for contributions to the field by a non-architect. In 2015, Phil presented a plenary talk on Lifetime Communities at the 52nd International Making Cities Livable conference in Bristol, U.K. and in 2016 at the same conference in Rome, Italy.

 
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YAMADA Chikako (Professor, Seitoku University)
Chikako Yamada (Ph.D. Anthropology)currently serves as professor at Seitoku University, Japan, in the Faculty of Psychology and Welfare. Her area of specialty is Cultural Anthropology and Studies on Immigrant Communities.
Her publications include:Transition of Japanese Immigrant Community in Canada (2000); “Immigrant Older Adults and Their Communities in Vancouver.” In Suzuki N. et al. (eds.) The Well-being of Older Adults and Cooperation in Life Design (2010); “Proverbial Saying in Nagasaki Islands” In Local Proverb (2014).

 
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SANO-Fujita Mariko (Professor, Hiroshima University)
Mariko Fujita-Sano (Ph.D. Anthropology)currently serves as professor at Hiroshima University, Japan, in the Faculty of Integrated Arts and Sciences, and serves as the director of the Accessibility Center there. Her area of specialty is Cultural Anthropology and Universal Design in Education.
Her publications include:A Search for People’s Life Worth Living of Old Age in America (1999); Life in Riverfront: A Midwestern Town Seen Through Japanese Eyes, (2001); Independent Living in Old Age (2001), and Accessibility and University Education (2009).

 
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SAWANO Michiko (Senior Researcher Ritsumeikan University)
Michiko Sawano (Ph.D. Philosophy) currently serves as senior researcher at Ritsumeikan University, Japan, in research organization of OIC. The area of specialty is Cultural Anthropology and Medical Anthropology.
The publication includes: Medical Anthropology of Women and Their Family who live with Breast Cancer (2017). The articles include: Living in ‘Correctness’ without the Correct Answer: Treatments of Cancer Patients in Korea (2016); Rethinking Korean Families from the Perspective of Caring Reconstruction: The Case of Married Female Breast Cancer Patients (2013).

 
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SUZUKI Nanami (Professor, National Museum of Ethnology)
Nanami Suzuki (Ph.D. in academics Anthropology) currently serves as professor at National Museum of Ethnology and Graduate University for Advanced Studies. Her area of specialization is Cultural Anthropology and Aging Studies. Her publications include:Historical Anthropology of Childbirth [in Japanese]. Tokyo: Shinyosha (1997). (won the 13th Nao Aoyama Prize for Women’s History); Historical Anthropology of Healing [in Japanese]. Kyoto: Sekaishisosha (2002); The Well-being of Older Adults and Cooperation in Life Design [in Japanese]. Tokyo: Ochanomizushobo (2010) (co-edited by Kuniko Fujiwara and Mitsuhiro Iwasa), and “Crossing Over: A Story That Reverberates in the world and Outer Space,” In Suzuki N. (ed.) Living in a Community of Resilience: A Comparative Study on the Search for Well-being in Multicultural Aging Societies. Osaka: National Museum of Ethnology (2013).