The National Museum of Ethnology (Minpaku) is a research center for ethnology and cultural anthropology.
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BULLETIN OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF ETHNOLOGY Vol. 34 No. 3 2010

Han, Min
Diary Written by a Chinese Christian during the Civil War Time of the 1940’s: Introduction and Background of a Document in National Museum of Ethnology
455
Ichinosawa, Jumpei
Japanese residents and reputational disaster in Phuket after the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami
521
Matisoff, James A.
Toward a Eurasian Bestiary: (I) OTTER in Tibeto-Burman and Mon-Khmer (II) JACKAL in Sino-Tibetan and Indo-European
575
Savelle, James M.
Cumulative Bowhead Whale (Balaena mysticetus) Harvest Estimates by Prehistoric Thule Inuit in the Canadian Arctic 1200–1500 A.D.: Implications for Bowhead Whale Population Modeling and Thule Demography
593




Diary Written by a Chinese Christian during the Civil War Time of the 1940’s:
Introduction and Background of a Document in National Museum of Ethnology
Han Min
This research note introduces a Chinese diary and a Japanese translation in the full text for 149 days written by a Chinese Christian between from January 8, 1946 and May 31, 1948. It also considers and analyzes the activity of Suzhou Christian Gospel Church belonging to American Presbyterian Mission, North, activity of Agricultural Science Examination Center of Suzhou Church and the relation among the military forces of the National Party, citizens in Suzhou and the church during the Civil War Time recorded from perspectives of a citizen and a Christian, and the anthropological background of this material.
The diary was collected by the author in Anhui Province in 2008, and is stored to the National Museum of Ethnology as research material now. Since the diary records the activity of Suzhou Christian Gospel Church, the relation of National Party’s military forces, citizens and the church in detail from perspectives of a Chinese Christian, people can obtain valuable information which is different from publications such as the offi cial document, newspapers, books, etc. at that time. This paper raises some possibilities of how to use such kind of text materials in the anthropological studies of history.
Key Words:diary, Suzhou Christian Gospel Church, Chinese Civil War between National Party and Communist Party, Pearl Buck


Japanese residents and reputational disaster in Phuket after the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami
Jumpei Ichinosawa
As an impact of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, Phuket suffered from a severe decline in tourism. In the disaster-stricken beach resorts of Thailand the effects of the tsunami can be seen as a long-term socioeconomic phenomenon. The decrease in the number of tourists has brought about serious stagnation in the regional economy. The post-tsunami tourism decline is a complex process involving risk-induced stigmatization of the region and historically embedded vulnerabilities in the local society. Based on qualitative field research intermittently conducted between February and December 2005, this paper describes the process and mechanism of this secondary impact (the reputational disaster) in Phuket. The main focus of this paper is to describe how Japanese residents in Phuket coped with the reputational disaster from the perspective of risk as defi ned by N. Luhmann. The struggle of Japanese residents against the reputational disaster can be understood as a cognitive and behavioral movement of converting a danger to risks rather than the choice of risks for attention as M. Douglas’s cultural theory of risk perception assumes.
Key Words:2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, Phuket, reputational disaster, risk


Toward a Eurasian Bestiary:
(I) OTTER in Tibeto-Burman and Mon-Khmer
(II) JACKAL in Sino-Tibetan and Indo-European
James A. Matisoff
Part I. Otter in Tibeto-Burman and Mon-Khmer
The well-known PTB etymon *sram or *s-ram ‘otter’ is discussed in detail, with emphasis on the issues involved in reconstructing initial clusters vs. sequences of prefi x-plus-initial. The puzzling Written Burmese form phyam, with initial labial, is explained in terms of contamination from a Mon-Khmer root.

Part II. Jackal in Sino-Tibetan and Indo-European
The English word jackal derives ultimately from Sanskrit , via a tortuous history that involves French, Turkish, and Persian intermediaries. The Sanskrit form is isolated in Indo-European, and specialists agree that it is a loan from an outside source. This paper tries to show that a case can be made for localizing this source in Tibeto-Burman, where a root *s-kywal ‘wild dog’ can be reconstructed. A fi nal hypothesis is offered, relating Sino- Tibetan etyma for canines to the Proto-Indo-European root *kwon.
Key Words:Sino-Tibetan, Tibeto-Burman, Mon-Khmer, Indo-European, otter, jackal


Cumulative Bowhead Whale (Balaena mysticetus) Harvest Estimates by Prehistoric Thule Inuit in the Canadian Arctic 1200-1500 A.D.:
Implications for Bowhead Whale Population Modeling and Thule Demography
James M. Savellef
Many prehistoric Thule Inuit culture (ca. 1200-1500 A.D.) subsistence economies in the eastern Canadian Arctic have traditionally been considered to have included the bowhead whale (Balaena mysticetus). However, the exact extent to which Thule hunted bowheads has been a contentious issue, and those few attempts to estimate cumulative harvests have been extrapolated from bowhead bone weight estimates for Thule sites published 30 years ago. This study presents an updated data base of bowhead whale bones at Thule sites on Somerset Island and neighbouring regions. Using bone counts as opposed to estimated bone weights, and extrapolating for buried bone, whale bone removed by carvers, and struck and lost animals, it is estimated that 5,470 bowheads were killed in the study region. Extrapolating to the rest of the Canadian Arctic, and including recent estimates for Greenland, the estimated total removal of bowhead whales from the eastern Arctic bowhead stock by Thule Inuit is 18,523. This is not an insignifi cant number, even when averaged over 300 years, and as has been recently recognized by biologists,must be factored in when modeling ‘pristine’ (i.e. pre-commercial hunting) bowhead stocks. Furthermore, it demonstrates quite conclusively that Thule were indeed pre-eminent bowhead hunters, and not simply opportunistic generalists.
Key Words:Thule Inuit, Bowhead whaling, Cumulative harvest, Eastern Arctic